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May 16th, 2009:

Disputing An Erroneous $450 Porn Charge Is A " Serious Violation Of Our Terms Of Use"

ImLive.com: Disputing An Erroneous $450 Porn Charge Is A "Serious Violation Of Our Terms Of Use"

So okay, it’s an adult site, but the issue is a general one:

A consumer who had left his credit card info on file with ImLive.com discovered that someone had accessed his account and used his credit card to purchase $450 worth of credits to view the… um… wares. When he was notified of his “purchase” by email, he immediately called them. The site wouldn’t refund his money because someone had logged into his account using his user/pass, and as far as they were concerned, it was a valid purchase (half of the funds had already been used within minutes). He immediately changed his user/pass to prevent the unauthorized individual from being able to use the account any more, but there was still the issue of the charge on his credit card which he did not authorize, want, or use.

The Consumerist tells the rest of the story, but this is the second breach this week that I’ve read where a site was not hacked but a user’s failure to either use a unique user/pass for each site or to protect their user/pass was implicated in the breach of their accounts.

I would guess that many readers of PogoWasRight.org are savvy enough not to use the same user/pass on more that one site, but just in case you’ve forgotten about some obsolete accounts somewhere, maybe this would be a good time to change your user/pass for your current sites and accounts.

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URL: http://www.pogowasright.org/article.php?story=20090516152827592

Real ID Opposition Substantiated

PA: Sam Rohrer: Real ID Opposition Substantiated

Following the recent grand jury’s announcement that more than 45 people have been charged with issuing fraudulent drivers’ licenses, Representative Sam Rohrer, prime sponsor of legislation to outlaw Real ID in Pennsylvania, issued the following statement:

“This most recent debacle highlights my long-standing concerns with government entities taking and storing an individual’s personally identifying information, often without their knowledge or consent. PennDOT has lost credibility over this fiasco; no driver can feel safe knowing that his or her personal information, including social security number and biometric data, is vulnerable to this kind of misconduct.”

Source – Tenth Amendment Center

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URL: http://www.pogowasright.org/article.php?story=20090516144719243

Employees can’t expect privacy on employers’ computers (editorial)

Ca: Employees can’t expect privacy on employers’ computers (editorial)

An editorial on the case of high school teacher Richard Cole who allegedly misused his access to the school’s network to access a male student’s email account and download a copy of nude photo that a female student had sent the male student. Cole was arrested after an IT worker performing routine work discovered the folder on Cole’s hard drive and the drive was turned over to the police. You may be surprised by the court’s ruling on this one, so do read the whole editorial.

Now what does this high school teacher who didn’t respect the privacy of his students do to defend himself? He argues police violated his privacy rights by seizing and viewing this computer without having first obtained a search warrant. That’s right, Cole argued he had a reasonable expectation of privacy in his computer and its hard drives and the failure to obtain a search warrant violated his right to be free from unreasonable search and seizure under Section 8 of the Charter of Rights.

Source – The Sudbury Star

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URL: http://www.pogowasright.org/article.php?story=20090516053356779

GPS and Privacy Rights (Editorial)

GPS and Privacy Rights (Editorial)

On the appellate ruling in Weaver v. People this week

…. Rather than wade into unclear federal law, the New York State Court of Appeals based its decision on the State Constitution’s privacy provision. The rule the court laid down will apply in New York no matter how the Supreme Court interprets the Fourth Amendment.

There will no doubt be many more federal and state court rulings about the constitutionality of warrantless GPS monitoring. It is never easy to fit modern technology into the broad privacy principles that the drafters of the federal and state constitutions laid out. As judges look for guidance, this week’s decision from New York State’s highest court is the place to start.

Source – NY Times

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URL: http://www.pogowasright.org/article.php?story=20090516051945473